Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Theme 5: RELATIONSHIP OF STRUCTURE & FUNCTION

Theme 5: RELATIONSHIP OF STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
Explanation: The structural levels from molecules to organisms ensure successful functioning in all living organisms and living systems.
Clarification: You would post here examples of structure-function relationships in living organisms. How specific molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, and body structures are structured to support the functions that they perform. (Don't forget plants!)

10 comments:

Navneet said...

Protein structure determines its function. Proteins consist of long chains of amino acids folded up into complex shapes. If one of the amino acids was missing or different in that amino acid chain, than the whole protein would serve a different function. Sickle Cell anemia is an example of this.

Muskan said...

Nucleic acids store and transmit hereditary function. One of the examples is this DNA. DNA is composed of a double helix. Each step of DNA's helical staircase is a base-pair, consisting of a base in one chain attracted by hydrogen bonds to a base opposite it on the other chain. The hydrogen bonds allows the DNA to be easily separated and easily put together.

Navneet said...

Longer necked giraffes survive better and leave more offspring who inherit their long necks. Longer necks enable the giraffes to reach for leaves and plants that are high on trees.

Muskan said...

The large ears of the African elephants enable them to survive better in the extreme heat in the African subcontinent. The larger ears enable the elephants to keep their cool and gives them a chance to escape from the heat.

ryan g said...

amino acids structure directly effects its function. It is a lock and key method that cannot work unless the structure fit together. When they fit they can carry out the function of speeding up a chemical process.

Mankiran said...

The Villi in the intestines have a large surface area and are thin to ensure the greatest amount of diffusion of certain nutrients and nourishing agents into the cappilaries. Therefore, giving the blood nutrients to carry to the cells of the body. Also, the cappillaries that run through the alveoli undergo the same concept. The alveoli act as the donor of oxygen to the blood and recieve carbon dioxide for exhalation.

Amherst High School does work.

ACV said...

What actually defines the function of any entity? It is the composition (what it is made of), the structure (how things are arranged) and the environment (how the entity actually performs its function). In non living systems, composition isn't always relevant - (you could use a key made of aluminum or of steel, it would still work). In living systems, you need all the components almost all the time. So, to conclude, there's more to function than just structure :)

robpbyw said...

Navneet is wrong. Function determines structure and not the other way around. In order to survive and procreate, organisms have many functions and these needs dictate what molecules (proteins in particular) have to be recruited to fulfil that function. The proteins which survive this selection process have a structure which allows them to carry out the function, but the function/need came first.

robpbyw said...

Navneet is wrong. Function determines structure and not the other way around. In order to survive and procreate, organisms have many functions and these needs dictate what molecules (proteins in particular) have to be recruited to fulfil that function. The proteins which survive this selection process have a structure which allows them to carry out the function, but the function/need came first.

Bob Chap said...

There is no purpose to a particular function. It simply exists and if it happens to be beneficial it is passed on. Structure is determined by function for this reason as natural selection does not have foresight to determine whether to implement or modify a structure in the future in order to provide a more advantageous function.